History Matters to Me

It's a mystery.

1,139 notes

coolchicksfromhistory:

Christine de Pizan (1364- c. 1430)
Art by April Babcock (tumblr)
Christine de Pizan is one of the best known writers of the medieval period, yet if not for circumstances beyond her control she might never have picked up a pen.  The daughter of an Italian scientist at the court of Charles V of France, Christine was given a classical education before her marriage at the age of fifteen to a royal secretary named Etienne du Castel.  When she was 25, her beloved husband died in an epidemic.  As her father had already passed away, Christine found herself responsible for the care of not only herself and her two children, but also her mother and an orphaned niece.
Christine began writing love ballads that caught the attention of wealthy patrons who enjoyed both her poetry and the novelty of a female writer.  Christine wrote hundreds of poems, many on commission for specific nobles, and this work allowed her to support her family and clear the debts left after her husband’s death.
Christine’s most famous work, The Book of the City of Ladies (1405), is an impassioned defense of women.  It challenged misogyny by creating a symbolic city of righteous women.  The women profiled include historical figures such as Zenobia and Sappho, pagan goddesses such as Isis and Minerva, women from the Hebrew Bible such as Deborah and the unnamed Woman of Valor (Proverbs 31), and Christian saints such as the Virgin Mary and St. Lucy.  Christine’s book was a testimony to the accomplishments of women and argued for wider access to education for women. 
While The Book of the City of Ladies is primarily about female achievement, Christine also included an anti-rape message.  As a character in the book, Christine says “I am therefore troubled and grieved when men argue that many women want to be raped and that it does not bother them at all to be raped by men even when they verbally protest…”  Lady Rectitude, one of Christine’s guides in The Book of the City of Ladies, responds “Rest assured, dear friend, chaste ladies who live honestly take absolutely no pleasure in being raped. Indeed, rape is the greatest possible sorrow for them. Many upright women have demonstrated that this is true with their own credible examples…”
In 1418, Christine retired to a convent in Poissy.  At the convent she wrote one final poem which she dedicated to Joan of Arc.  It is the only known French language work about Joan of Arc written during Joan’s lifetime.

coolchicksfromhistory:

Christine de Pizan (1364- c. 1430)

Art by April Babcock (tumblr)

Christine de Pizan is one of the best known writers of the medieval period, yet if not for circumstances beyond her control she might never have picked up a pen.  The daughter of an Italian scientist at the court of Charles V of France, Christine was given a classical education before her marriage at the age of fifteen to a royal secretary named Etienne du Castel.  When she was 25, her beloved husband died in an epidemic.  As her father had already passed away, Christine found herself responsible for the care of not only herself and her two children, but also her mother and an orphaned niece.

Christine began writing love ballads that caught the attention of wealthy patrons who enjoyed both her poetry and the novelty of a female writer.  Christine wrote hundreds of poems, many on commission for specific nobles, and this work allowed her to support her family and clear the debts left after her husband’s death.

Christine’s most famous work, The Book of the City of Ladies (1405), is an impassioned defense of women.  It challenged misogyny by creating a symbolic city of righteous women.  The women profiled include historical figures such as Zenobia and Sappho, pagan goddesses such as Isis and Minerva, women from the Hebrew Bible such as Deborah and the unnamed Woman of Valor (Proverbs 31), and Christian saints such as the Virgin Mary and St. Lucy.  Christine’s book was a testimony to the accomplishments of women and argued for wider access to education for women. 

While The Book of the City of Ladies is primarily about female achievement, Christine also included an anti-rape message.  As a character in the book, Christine says “I am therefore troubled and grieved when men argue that many women want to be raped and that it does not bother them at all to be raped by men even when they verbally protest…”  Lady Rectitude, one of Christine’s guides in The Book of the City of Ladies, responds “Rest assured, dear friend, chaste ladies who live honestly take absolutely no pleasure in being raped. Indeed, rape is the greatest possible sorrow for them. Many upright women have demonstrated that this is true with their own credible examples…”

In 1418, Christine retired to a convent in Poissy.  At the convent she wrote one final poem which she dedicated to Joan of Arc.  It is the only known French language work about Joan of Arc written during Joan’s lifetime.

5 notes

Lovely photographs. Photographer Bryan Alexander has travelled Siberia documenting the lives of the Chukchi, Dolgan, E’ven, Khanty, Komi, Nenets, and Nganasan people, showing their traditional camps, transportation and dress, as well as activities such as herding, hunting and fishing. ‘Whisper of the Stars: Traditional Life in the Arctic’ Siberia is at the Horniman Museum till September.

More photographs here.

728 notes

ancientpeoples:

Gold hairnet with medallion. 
The figure on the medallion is a maenad, a follower of the Greek god Dionysus. This work represents the best quality of goldsmith’s work in the Hellenistic world. 
Greek, Hellenistic Period, Ptolemaic Period, 200 - 150 BC. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum

Truly a Golden Age.

ancientpeoples:

Gold hairnet with medallion. 

The figure on the medallion is a maenad, a follower of the Greek god Dionysus. This work represents the best quality of goldsmith’s work in the Hellenistic world. 

Greek, Hellenistic Period, Ptolemaic Period, 200 - 150 BC. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

Truly a Golden Age.

(via anthrocentric)

212 notes

ancientpeoples:

Wooden face from mummy case
These face would be placed upon the mummy as a ancient back up to the original face. The body of the deceased had to remain intact, this was essential if the deceased wished to enjoy the afterlife. So in order to make sure that the deceased would have an eternal afterlife body parts would be copied and added to the tomb equipment. The eyes, eyebrows and eyelashed are done in black ink. 
19cm by 17.3cm (7 1/2 x 6 13/16 inch)
Egyptian
Location and further date are unknown
Source: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 

ancientpeoples:

Wooden face from mummy case

These face would be placed upon the mummy as a ancient back up to the original face. The body of the deceased had to remain intact, this was essential if the deceased wished to enjoy the afterlife. So in order to make sure that the deceased would have an eternal afterlife body parts would be copied and added to the tomb equipment. The eyes, eyebrows and eyelashed are done in black ink. 

19cm by 17.3cm (7 1/2 x 6 13/16 inch)

Egyptian

Location and further date are unknown

Source: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 

39 notes

socimages:

Whose economic recovery is it?

"Stocks and profits have enjoyed a remarkable recovery.  While income is slightly up over the period, it is critical to remember that this is average income and the increase largely reflects gains for those at the very top of the income distribution.  Jobs and housing have yet to recover.
So, with returns to capital booming, it is easy to understand why business leaders are relatively content with current policies and, by extension, political leaders are reluctant to rock the boat.”

Read more from economist Martin Landsberg at Sociological Images.

socimages:

Whose economic recovery is it?

"Stocks and profits have enjoyed a remarkable recovery.  While income is slightly up over the period, it is critical to remember that this is average income and the increase largely reflects gains for those at the very top of the income distribution.  Jobs and housing have yet to recover.

So, with returns to capital booming, it is easy to understand why business leaders are relatively content with current policies and, by extension, political leaders are reluctant to rock the boat.”

Read more from economist Martin Landsberg at Sociological Images.

3,180 notes

occupiedmuslim:


From the series
 Aldeia Maracana : Indiians VS FIFA

by Kim Badaw

(2013) In 1978, the Rio de Janeiro Museum of the Indian moved out of its home in the city’s Maracanã neighborhood. The historic building sat abandoned for nearly three decades until 2006, when real Brazilian Indians started moving in. Today, dozens of indigenous Brazilians from distant corners of the country call the museum grounds home, where they make traditional crafts, grow food and tobacco, and invite Cariocas to learn about their cultures. They call their community Aldeia Maracanã, or Maracanã Village.

Recently, local authorities proposed new residents for Aldeia Maracanã: thousands of soccer fans. The neighboring Maracanã Stadium, which will host major events in the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympic Games, needs a new entryway and expanded parking, according to administrators. Under this plan, the Indians would be evicted and the building and its grounds would be demolished to make way for new construction.

The conflict escalated throughout last year until January 12, 2013, when police surrounded the museum grounds. They were met by Indians brandishing bows and arrows, and by local activists bearing posters and pamphlets. Faced with this protest, the police decided to leave the area as authorities awaited a court order to evict the Indians. The fate of the building is now in limbo, although administrators insist on evicting the Indians.

Read the captions and interviews here.

(via anthrocentric)

84 notes

The legitimate object of government, is to do for a community of people, whatever they need to have done, but can not do, at all, or can not, so well do, for themselves — in their separate, and individual capacities.
Abraham Lincoln (via azspot)

(via azspot)

1 note

Bride, Kosovo
Photograph by Nita Zeqiri
A tradition a thousand years old, passed on to generations in today’s remote Donje Ljubinje in the Zhupa area in south Kosovo. Today, this tradition is at the verge of extinction, as only a 65-year-old lady continues preparing young brides according to their traditions. The bride’s face is painted in many beautiful layers of color. Three golden circles symbolizing the cycles of life are tied to one another by the golden roads that one crosses over their lifetime. The inner red circles are symbols of fertility, where red and blue dots are born from, and the whole face is covered by them, wishing her a healthy and happy family.
Photo from National Geographic Images.
This is video of the bride having her face painted.

 

Bride, Kosovo

Photograph by Nita Zeqiri

A tradition a thousand years old, passed on to generations in today’s remote Donje Ljubinje in the Zhupa area in south Kosovo. Today, this tradition is at the verge of extinction, as only a 65-year-old lady continues preparing young brides according to their traditions. The bride’s face is painted in many beautiful layers of color. Three golden circles symbolizing the cycles of life are tied to one another by the golden roads that one crosses over their lifetime. The inner red circles are symbols of fertility, where red and blue dots are born from, and the whole face is covered by them, wishing her a healthy and happy family.

Photo from National Geographic Images.

This is video of the bride having her face painted.

 

1 note

Benito Mussolini’s mug shot, June 20, 1903. Before founding the fascist movement in Italy, Mussolini was involved in Italian socialism. In 1903 he was arrested in Bern, Switzerland, for advocating a violent general strike. He had left Italy in 1902 partly because he wanted to avoid conscription.

Benito Mussolini’s mug shot, June 20, 1903. Before founding the fascist movement in Italy, Mussolini was involved in Italian socialism. In 1903 he was arrested in Bern, Switzerland, for advocating a violent general strike. He had left Italy in 1902 partly because he wanted to avoid conscription.